HAND EMBROIDERED BLOUSES

Oaxacan Child's Blouse
Oaxacan Child's Blouse
$15.95

Size: 8.5" x 15" Sz.1

Oaxacan Child's Blouse
Oaxacan Child's Blouse
$15.95

Size: 11" x 19" Sz. 4

PUEBLA BLOUSE
PUEBLA BLOUSE
$89.00

Size: MEDIUM

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Mexican textiles have existed for more than 7000 years, but now in many villages’ traditional embroidered blouses, back strap woven huipiles, loomed quechquemitls and belts are worn only by the grandmothers. Mexico's indigenous textile culture is in danger of extinction. The embroidered designs on blouses and huipiles are particular to specific towns and ethnic groups. The textiles identifies the groups and villages that various textiles come from, sometimes it is ribbons or the way they comb their hair. The 7000 years old time line ends with these grandmothers. These wonderful colorful textiles link the indigenous peoples with culture and cosmovison of their native culture. As grandmothers, daughters and granddaughters sit with other family members to make the garments they discuss style, techniques but something else more important, behaviors, customs of marriage, child birth, the herbs used for healing, how to make a tamales etc. These links are lost staring into the one eyed Cyclops that is the TV or washing floors in the DF. Most common traje garment is the huipil, a full, square-shouldered, short to mid-sleeved dress, often hand-embroidered with animal and floral designs and embellished with ribbons. Probably the most popular Oaxaca huipiles are the captivating designs from San Pedro de Amusgos (Amusgo tribe; white cotton, embroidered with abstract colored animal and floral motifs). Others nearly as prized include the Trique styles from around San Andrés Chicahuaxtla (white cotton, brighly embroidered red stripes, interwoven with green, blue, and yelllow, and hung with colored ribbons); Mazatec, from Huatla de Jiménez (white cotton, with bright flowers embroidered in multiple panels, crossed by horizontal and vertical purple and magenta silk ribbons); and Isthmus Zapotec, from Tehuantepec (brightly colored cotton, densely embroidered with either geometric designs or a field of flamboyant, multicolored flowers).